The Eel and The Discipline of Small Steps

Have you ever tried to hold on to a live eel? You’ll hardly ever succeed. I grew up in Northern Germany at the Steinhuder Meer, and there are eels there. With my school class, I went to an eel smokehouse once, and we were allowed to try to hold an eel. It slips through your fingers. Nobody could hold it for more than a few seconds.

Sometimes it seems to me that the business value of a new technical solution is like an eel. You’ve invested millions in new software or services, and in the end you’re not sure whether this investment has delivered measurable added value for your own company. This seems to be a trend across all industries, but especially in modern IT such as cloud computing, IT departments have a hard time. Vendors are reacting with new roles such as Customer Success Manager. A search on LinkedIn for this job title yields 65,671 hits today. These people help customers to realize the added value of a solution.

In an ideal world, a product delivers its business value after installation and everyone is happy. But the world is not ideal. Especially solutions that involve change of operational processes, that are supposed to deliver particularly high added value, require a change in user behavior. That starts at the Apple Retail Store, where you can get a demonstration of how to make the transition to Apple products work. But this is even more true in large companies. This is often referred to as operational transformation, the change in IT operations.

That’s why I’m a big fan of small steps: Think big and start small. If the value of a great idea is visible in a first implementation after a short time, then the IT manager can provide management with more reliable predictions about future business value.

Look for a concrete use case that is close to the business. Define how you want to measure success. Pay special attention to how you want to measure the success of a business transformation. And don’t wait too long until the first milestone is reached.

When there is a special relationship of trust between customer and supplier, sometimes very large projects are initiated and new investments are made before the previous project has delivered measurable business value. This can work, but in the long run it is a risk for both sides. Think about the discipline of small steps.

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